The Soloist

2009

Biography / Drama / Music

The Soloist (2009) download yts

Synopsis


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Director

Cast

Robert Downey Jr. as Steve Lopez
Jamie Foxx as Nathaniel Ayers
Catherine Keener as Mary Weston
Nelsan Ellis as David Carter
720p 1080p
1.42 GB
1280*720
PG-13
23.976 fps
1hr 49 min
P/S Unknown
2.23 GB
1920*1080
PG-13
23.976 fps
1hr 49 min
P/S Unknown

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by claygoul-1 10 / 10

Music Menanced By Madness

Within a one-week period, I saw my second screening of this powerful movie today. I am mystified by some of the "bilious-type" reviews found here, seemingly driven by an anti-Joe Wright campaign. I found no cheap sentiments in the story line and I was awed by the high-octane performances of Jamie Foxx and Robert Downey, Jr. Nothing being perfect in an imperfect world, as "adult" entertainment, "The Soloist" did not once insult my intelligence. I marveled at the complexity of the screenplay and the realization of it by its gifted director and the camera-work of Seamus McGarvey. The gifted Dario Marianelli is credited as the film's composer, anecdotally, in the gigantic shadow of Ludwig van Beethoven. Mental illness, genius, homelessness, journalism and music has rarely been so well presented as an "entertainment." Yes, Mr. Ayers is depicted as experiencing a "light show" when attending a rehearsal of the L. A. Philharmonic. At least we didn't see pink hippopotamus in tutus or dinosaurs on a rampage in a prehistoric setting. Being so accustomed to televised concerts, I expected the camera to focus on the instruments themselves in this sequence. And, "clapping pigeons." Great idea that works. A brave film directed at a "non-art house" audience. I also want to cite the wonderful work of Nelsan Ellis who plays David at LAMP. So much compassion comes off the screen with his presence. There is no way we can make "light" of the tragedy of the homeless, so many with mental illness. Thank you Mr. Steve Lopez for introducing me to Mr. Nathaniel Anthony Ayers. My life is richer for the experience. LisaGay Hamilton, as Jennifer Ayers, Nathaniel's sister, deserves recognition in a small, but pivotal role that brings dignity and catharsis to a heart-wrenching experience.

Reviewed by zetes 8 / 10

Wright, Downey and Foxx are good enough artists to lift this above its Oscar bait plot

This film was supposed to be a major competitor for the Oscars last year, but Paramount bumped it to a few months later. Despite the mixed reviews the film has received, I believe it would have been a major contender. I honestly think Paramount's decision not only ruined its chances for Oscars, it gave the impression that there was something wrong with the picture. There isn't, really. The subject matter does scream "Oscar Bait", with Robert Downey Jr. playing a newspaper columnist who writes about a schizophrenic genius musician (Jamie Foxx) who is homeless on the streets of L.A. We all remember Shine. Shine was pretty good (if entirely made up, as we later discovered). The Soloist is probably a little better. I think it's stronger because of its exploration of the relationship between the two central characters. Both Downey and Foxx are extremely good; both are award-worthy. This material could easily have been cheesy Oscar bait, but director Joe Wright (Pride and Prejudice and Atonement) is a virtuoso himself. The way he uses image and sound move the story along beautifully, not allowing the clichés to clog up the film.

Reviewed by jon.h.ochiai 10 / 10

"The Soloist" Will Carry You Home

Robert Downey Jr. is amazing in Joe Wright's "The Soloist". Downey is powerful, and embodies such humanity and compassion. His performance is never self-conscious, all about the character and the story. There is a quiet scene where Downey's Steve Lopez confesses to his ex-wife Mary (wonderful Catherine Keener) about Nathaniel Ayers (Jamie Foxx), "He's got a gift…" But Steve is at the breaking point in his efforts in helping the disturbed former child protégée. Keener consoles, "You are not going to cure him… All you can do is be his friend." "The Soloist" is brilliant in its catharsis and simplicity. Director Joe Wright ("Atonement") literally orchestrates powerful and touching performances from Downey and Foxx. Screenwriter Susannah Grant does a virtuoso translation of Los Angeles Times columnist Steve Lopez's book. I loved "The Soloist". "The Soloist" is so compelling in its humanity.

Based on a true story, "The Soloist" tells the story of Steve's (Downey) friendship with Nathaniel (Foxx). By accident L.A. Times writer Steve Lopez meets Nathaniel Ayers on his lunch break in the park. The homeless Nathaniel is playing Beethoven on his two string violin. Nathaniel admits to Steve, "…I've had a few set backs." Steve sees a potential story in this—for him. After initial research, Steve discovers that Nathaniel was a student at Julliard, who mysteriously dropped out in 1970. Through Grant's narrative we learn that the musical genius Nathaniel may have battled schizophrenia since childhood.

"The Soloist" follows Steve's journey to salvage Nathaniel's life. Wright and Grant also make us aware of the plight of the homeless in Los Angeles, and the efforts of such noble causes as LAMP. They also provide insight into the pain and suffering of the mentally ill and challenged. To that end Jaime Foxx is defined authenticity. As Nathaniel, Foxx brilliantly stays the course, because his character will not change. That transformation is left to Downey's Steve, who must deliver on their partnership. Downey astounds. He is so believable and compelling as the good and decent man doing his best, and at a loss as to what to do. At one story arc, Nathaniel tells Steve, "I love you." That is not what Steve wanted to hear, because now he is responsible for another. He confesses to the LAMP director, "I don't want to be his only thing!"

The most astounding thing about Downey's compassionate performance is displayed when he is listening and in his silence. There is a breathtaking scene where Steve gives Nathaniel a cello, and eyes widen as he listens to Nathaniel play. He and Foxx have a touching screen partnership. I was in awe in a scene where Downey and Foxx sit together and listen to a Los Angeles Symphony rehearsal at the Disney Concert Hall.

"The Soloist" at times is off paced and is distracted by some narrative turns. However, it has great heart. Jaime Foxx is compelling and true. Robert Downey Jr. is electrifying. This is truly his movie—he is awesome. In the words of Downey's Steve, "Being his friend will carry you home." See "The Soloist", and allow yourself to be moved.

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