The Return of the Pink Panther

1975

Action / Comedy / Crime / Mystery

The Return of the Pink Panther (1975) download yts

Synopsis


Added By: Kaiac
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Director

Cast

Christopher Plummer as Sir Charles Litton
Peter Sellers as Insp. Jacques Clouseau
Herbert Lom as Chief Insp. Charles Dreyfus
Catherine Schell as Lady Claudine Litton
720p 1080p
835.73 MB
1280*720
G
23.976 fps
1hr 53 min
P/S Unknown
1.72 GB
1920*1080
G
23.976 fps
1hr 53 min
P/S Unknown

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by jhclues 9 / 10

The Return Of "Clouseau"

The famous and invaluable diamond known as the Pink Panther is stolen once again from the museum in Lugash, and the authorities decide immediately that to effect the return of this National Treasure they must seek the help of the one man they know will bring the needed expertise to the case: Clouseau. And so it is that `The Return Of The Pink Panther' is entrusted to none other than the inimitable Inspector (Peter Sellers) from France, much to the chagrin of Chief Inspector Dreyfus (Herbert Lom), who, knowing what unbridled mayhem Clouseau is really capable of, would like nothing more than to be rid of him once and for all. But such a request from the sovereign authorities of a friendly nation cannot be denied, and Clouseau is therefore dispatched with all haste to Lugash, with orders to bring the criminals to justice, and insure that the case is indeed-- to quote Clouseau-- `solv-ed.' Some ten years had passed since director Blake Edwards and Sellers had teamed up for the brilliant film `A Shot In The Dark,' before coming together once again for this third installment chronicling the misadventures of the `belov-ed' Inspector Clouseau. But the wait was certainly worth it. Cleverly written and delivered, it affords Sellers ample opportunities to do what he does best: Make you laugh. Whether affecting an alias in disguise or forthrightly confronting the usual suspects, Clouseau deftly uncovers every `ploy' attempted by the unscrupulous thieves he seeks. There are moments so hilarious that even co-star Catherine Schell (Claudine) has trouble keeping a straight face at times; but rather than being a distraction (as you'd think it would be), it somehow makes it even funnier. And it's a great example of why this movie is so good, and why it works so well. Simply put, it's fun. Edwards has a formula for success that begins with having a good story at the core, an excellent supporting cast to flesh it all out, then mixing it all together with the main ingredient which is, of course, Sellers. It's one that works, and of which directors of some of the more recent fare being proffered as `comedy' could benefit. Christopher Plummer is well cast as debonair master thief Sir Charles Litton, bringing an air of sophistication to the film that contrasts so well with the antics of Sellers. Characters returning after debuting in `A Shot In The Dark' include the terrific Lom, whose Chief Inspector Dreyfus is the perfect foil for Clouseau; Andre Maranne (Francois); and of course Burt Kwouk as Clouseau's ever-attacking manservant, Cato. The scenes between Sellers and Kwouk, in which they spar at Clouseau's house, are a riot, as is the way Sellers and Lom play off of one another throughout the film (or the series, for that matter); Lom's `reactions' alone to what Sellers is doing are classic bits of comedy. Rounding out the supporting cast are Peter Arne (Colonel Sharky), Peter Jeffrey (General Wadafi), Gregoire Aslan (Chief of Lugash Police), Victor Spinetti (Hotel Concierge) and John Bluthal (Blind Beggar). A number of elements go into making a comedy work, and `The Return Of The Pink Panther' has them all, but most especially, Peter Sellers, who without a doubt is one of the funniest actors ever to grace the silver screen. His comedy works because he always plays it straight and allows the humor to flow naturally from the situation at hand; there's never a laugh that is forced or false. Consider one of the opening scenes in which Clouseau, walking a beat, questions a blind beggar with a monkey about having the proper permits to beg, all while the bank in front of which they are standing is being robbed. There's a purity about it that makes it a joy to watch; the kind of film you can see over and over again and never get tired of. One of the great things about video and DVD is that it affords us the opportunity of cuing up this film-- as well as the other `Panther' movies-- at will. For a lot of laughs, take advantage of the technology at hand and check out Peter Sellers and discover what `classic' comedy is all about. It never gets old, and somehow just keeps getting better with age. I rate this one 9/10.

Reviewed by brian_warren_wagner 10 / 10

One of the funniest in the series

Peter Sellers is in top form in the Pink Panther Returns as the bumbling Inspector Jacques Clouseau. This time around Closeau has been assigned to track down the thief that has stolen the Pink Panther Diamond from the Lugash. All evidence points to the supposedly retired thief the Phantom (also seen in The original Pink Panther but played there by David Niven )aka Charles Lytton. It is in true slapstick style that we see Clouseau bumble through one laugh out loud situation to another in trying to solve the case. Standout scenes include Clouseau going to Charle's Lytton's home posing as a telephone repair man, a runaway vacuum cleaner a fantastic escape by Charles Lytton from some thugs. There are many great moments in this film, and I would highly suggest it not only for a lot of laughs but for the comedic story.

Reviewed by secondtake 6 / 10

Silly, with Sellers in familiar form, but the first two are more classic

Return of the Pink Panther (1975)

Complete with the great Mancini sax theme, the nutty smart Blake Edwards directing, the sassy cartoon panther himself, and of course Peter Sellers as Inspector Clouseau (taking on many absurd disguises). This is the third of the original Pink Panther movies series (omitting the oddball fourth one from 1968 that didn't have Mancini, Sellers, or Edwards), and it comes over a decade after the first two. Was the public interested? Yes--it did well. It was a great formula. Is it still a good formula in 2012?

Good question. It depends on your taste. But surely the names repeated above are all cinema greats that, like Chaplin, rise above their time. But of course, Sellers, as terrific as he was, was no Charles Chaplin. At his best, the comedy is hilarious. And that makes the movie worth watching for sure. But he is sometimes a bit off in his timing, or is stuck playing a stunt that isn't worthy of him.

There's also a lag in the filler material, the scenes between the great stuff. Some marginal characters (including the leading woman, who is totally a late 60s type, not a 1975 type, and she feels oddly unnecessary) don't command their parts, or their scenes. The drift begins to drift. And then you realize there isn't much of a plot. The whole recovery (sort of) of the famous Pink Panther diamond after an elaborate theft isn't really the driving force of the movie. What takes its place is a slow interplay of the characters all stumbling over each other trying to trick the perpetrator into revealing the gem.

So then you are back to the stumbling as comedy, and sometimes it's great. There are so many ridiculous moments with Sellers being a bumbling fool like no one, you are sure to laugh. And that's what you're here for. "The Pink Panther" is the original, and at times also a bit sluggish, but it's the first. And "A Shot in the Dark" is the best of the three, I think. But if you like them, you'll be just fine here. If you haven't seen any, you might go in order, since the sets and music are really spot on in the first two, and a bit more transporting. There is something a little off kilter here that make it an awkward, but decent, third.

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