The Quiet Man

1952

Comedy / Drama / Romance

The Quiet Man (1952) download yts

Synopsis


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Director

Cast

Maureen O'Hara as Mary Kate Danaher
John Wayne as Sean Thornton
Patrick Wayne as Boy on Wagon at Horse Race
Ward Bond as Father Peter Lonergan
720p 1080p
920.94 MB
1280*720
G
23.976 fps
2hr 9 min
P/S Unknown
1.94 GB
1920*1080
G
23.976 fps
2hr 9 min
P/S Unknown

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by jhclues 10 / 10

Sean Thornton, Meet Mary Kate Danaher

The lush and beautiful countryside of Ireland provides the setting for this engaging tale of an Irishman, raised in America, going back home to escape a past he'd just as soon forget. In `The Quiet Man,' director John Ford returns to his own roots, going on location to tell the story of Sean Thornton (John Wayne), a man troubled by an incident that changed his life, and now doing what he can to forget about it and just move on. And toward that end, Sean travels to the place he knows so well from the stories told him by his mother, to Innisfree, intending to buy the cottage in which he was born, White O'Morn, where he can make a fresh start and build a new life for himself. There's a problem, however; the land and the cottage is owned by the widow Sarah Tillane (Mildred Natwick), and borders the estate of one Red Will Danaher (Victor McLaglen), who not only fancies the widow herself, but wants to buy her land. Squire Danaher (as he's known) is not the only one Sean must deal with, though, as other matters arise upon his arrival in the small hamlet of his birth. And her name is Mary Kate (Maureen O'Hara)-- who just happens to be Squire Danaher's sister. But Danaher or no, it makes no difference to Sean, who as soon as he lays eyes on Mary Kate determines to make her his wife.

Sean soon learns that in Ireland, however, such things are pursued quite differently than in America. To win the hand of Mary Kate he must employ the services of Michaleen Flynn (Barry Fitzgerald) a kind of matchmaker/chaperone/marriage broker, who will help him secure the consent of Squire Danaher, without which the marriage cannot and will not take place. So Sean has no choice but to acquiesce to the local traditions and customs, and Michaleen forthwith commences the appropriate overtures. In the meantime, he awaits the decision of the widow Tillane as to the purchase of White O'Morn, which he is determined to have at any cost.

John Ford directed more than 140 motion pictures, going back to the days of silent films, and his favorite star, with whom he worked in at least a dozen of his feature films, was John Wayne. And when you think of the John Ford/John Wayne collaborations, it's the Western that instantly comes to mind: `Stagecoach,' `She Wore A Yellow Ribbon,' `Fort Apache,' `Rio Grande' or `The Searchers,' (to name a few). Yet, `The Quiet Man' is perhaps their most memorable effort, and remains a favorite among fans to this day. Ford (who received an Oscar for Best Director for it) presents the story on a very personal level, and in Sean and Mary Kate gives the audience characters to whom they can relate; and it's that personal connection he affords the viewer that may suggest the main reason behind this particular film's popularity. That, plus the fact that at the core of this story there is an honesty and genuine sincerity that rings so true-to-life. Ford also successfully captures the essence of all that is good and positive about Ireland, from the richness of all of his characters to the lavish cinematography that brings the country so vividly to life. It's quite simply a wonderful, uplifting film, impeccably crafted and delivered by Ford and his superb cast.

Too often, John Wayne's work gets a bad rap; no matter what role he takes on, you're liable to hear `John Wayne is always John Wayne, the only difference is the character's name.' And, as he proves with his portrayal of Sean Thornton, it's not only a false statement, it's so unfair to an actor who brought so much to so many, in his craft as well as in his personal life. The Oscar he finally received for 1969's `True Grit' was way overdue, especially when you consider his performances in such films as `The Searchers,' `Red River' and, of course, this one. Is he the best actor of all time? Of course not; but he is good at what he does, much better than he is usually given credit for. And he (and his films) can always-- always-- be counted on to provide good, solid entertainment. Together, he and Ford have provided some of the most memorable moments in the history of the movies, and his pairing with Maureen O'Hara was a stroke of genius. There's real chemistry between them, which enables them to play so well off of one another. They made five films together between 1950 (`Rio Grande') and 1971 (`Big Jake'), and there is always that spark of magic between them, but never better than in this film.

A gifted actor, Maureen O'Hara is also, without question, one of the most beautiful women ever to grace the silver screen. It's easy to understand how Sean Thornton can fall instantly in love with her when he first sees her walking through the fields of Innisfree. It's entirely believable. And when you get to know the woman behind the beauty-- who Mary Kate is down deep-- it's even more understandable. Perfectly cast, O'Hara, like Ford, returned to her roots to make this film (she was born in Milltown, Ireland, near Dublin), and apparently it agreed with her, because her performance is nothing less than natural and inspired. Mary Kate Danaher, in fact, is arguably one of her-- if not `the'-- most memorable roles of her career.

The supporting cast, topped by Fitzgerald (who is absolutely unforgettable as Michaleen) also includes Ward Bond (Father Lonergan), Francis Ford (Dan Tobin), Arthur Shields (Reverend Playfair) and Jack MacGowran (Feeney). A delightful and endearing motion picture, `The Quiet Man' is, of all of John Ford's achievements, one of his best. And Sean, Mary Kate, Michaleen and all the people of Innisfree are ones you'll remember and want to visit again. It's the magic of the movies. I rate this one 10/10.

Reviewed by Paul 10 / 10

A simply wonderful film

What's not to like about this picture? A classic directed by the legendary John Ford. John Wayne and Maureen O'Hara light up the screen. Wayne's performance is brilliant, but what really stands out is that he is playing a regular guy with real feelings and emotions--no army uniforms, no indians to fight, no cavalry coming to the rescue--just a great performance. The supporting cast is unmatched--including great performances by Victor McLaglen, Barry Fitzgerald and Ward Bond. Look closely for Ken Curtis (Festus, from Gunsmoke) in an uncredited role. The scenery is absolutly breathtaking--it makes me want to go home to Ireland--and I'm not even Irish. To top it off The Quiet Man has the greatest fist fight ever captured on film. This is one of my two favorite John Wayne movies. The Duke should have gotten an Oscar for this one. Movie viewers won't be disapointed by this one.

Reviewed by Bill Slocum 9 / 10

A Woman's Film, Aye, But I Like It Too

Maureen O'Hara in Technicolor is surely any Irishman's dream, and "The Quiet Man" would be timeless for that alone. But O'Hara's performance is all the more indelible for the great good humor she bestows on her character, Mary Kate Danaher. Let's face it; with any other actress, this could have been a disaster.

Sean Thornton (John Wayne) comes back to County Mayo, his birthplace, to find a peace he lost tragically back home in America. He immediately discovers some old friends, and a new one, too, Mary Kate, who while herding sheep stares back at him in what James Joyce might have called "a significant manner."

Director John Ford elects to shoot O'Hara from an odd angle, and with an unusual overhead shadow crossing O'Hara's face, that in anyone else's hands would have totally blown the shot but here creates something, well, "Homerific." It's one of many amazing shots in a film that seems more painted than photographed, and is perhaps the most strikingly lovely film ever made.

The shot of O'Hara looking back at Wayne also clues you onto something else, that this is going to be her story as much as it is Thornton's. In fact, it's really more about her than it is about him, a film about romance and a woman's liberation at the hands of her lover. We call them "chick flicks" today. But since John Wayne is the nominal star and no one ever confused Ford with Douglas Sirk, "The Quiet Man" isn't popularly regarded this way.

It's fun to read all the comments about poor Mary Kate and how this film glamorizes the mistreatment of women. They have one thing right, it's a film about spousal domination, but it's the wife ruling the husband. Think about it: She makes her lover do just about everything he does in the film, even risk bodily injury at the hands of her brutish brother (she doesn't know about his past and thinks she married "a coward.") People complain that he drags her across a dung-covered field, while a helpful woman hands him a stick "to beat the lovely lady with." But of course it's Mary Kate who's in total control of the situation. She wants Thornton to fight for her, in every sense of the word, and won't make it easy. She wants him to adapt to her culture, rather than adapt to his. (She's not one to be "honked at," as she puts it.) It's not surprising she trips and falls at one point while Thornton pulls her across a field; probably one of those puppet strings of hers got in the way.

But there are worse things in life than being enslaved by the likes of Maureen O'Hara, like not being enslaved by the likes of Maureen O'Hara. She's not only beautiful and pure-hearted, but such a hilarious joy to be around. O'Hara plays up the comedy of her scenes very well; she could have opted for a more regal distance from the slapstick but plays it as rowdy as the rest instead. The scene when she spits in her hand before shaking with matchmaker Michaleen Flynn (Barry Fitzgerald, who gives the next-best performance after O'Hara) tells you who she is better than any of her many sexy moments on screen. It also gets back to the point of why she's so essential in this film. She is Ireland, the spirit of Erin, and you want her to win, not because she's so pretty but because you know she's good and right for Sean, too.

About the only things wrong with the film are the action sequences, the horse race and the fistfight between Sean and Mary Kate's brother. It's not because the scenes aren't terrific, but because they are so abbreviated, especially the fistfight, which feels likes its building to something even funnier and more rousing than what's come before when it just sort of stops. Ford apparently had to do some cutting to get his film in at the required length, and with his focus as much on Mary Kate as possible, probably preferred to trim the scenes that had the least to do with her. But since the focus on O'Hara is what makes the film anyway, this is a small matter. Wayne fans wanting more action will just have to content themselves with almost every other film the Duke ever made.

Seeing this film for the first time reminded me a lot of "Local Hero," the 1982 comedy. Not only is "The Quiet Man" also a fish-out-of-water story about an American in the British Isles (Scotland in "Local Hero"), both films maintain a very delicate balancing act between whimsy and pathos, with "The Quiet Man," siding on the former direction and "Local Hero" the latter. Definitely worth checking out the one if you saw and liked the other. But "Quiet Man" was there first.

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