The Lady in the Van

2015

Biography / Comedy / Drama

The Lady in the Van (2015) download yts

Synopsis


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Cast

Maggie Smith as Miss Shepherd
Dominic Cooper as Actor
James Corden as Market Trader
Jim Broadbent as Underwood
720p 1080p
757.28 MB
1280*720
PG-13
23.976 fps
1hr 44 min
P/S Unknown
1.58 GB
1920*1080
PG-13
23.976 fps
1hr 44 min
P/S Unknown

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Martin Bradley 8 / 10

A third Oscar for Maggie? Very probable, I'd say.

Like all the best English comedies, the humor in "The Lady in the Van" is founded on character and in eccentricity but then we should expect nothing less from the pen of the great Alan Bennett. This is mostly a true story we are told and it's the story of a very eccentric lady and one, or is it two, quite eccentric men. The lady is Mary, or is it Margaret, Shepherd who might be considered homeless were it not for the van she lives in. The somewhat eccentric man is Bennett himself. I said two because in this case we get two Bennetts for the price of one, Alan the writer and Alan the householder and they are both played by Alex Jennings.

Miss Shepherd really existed and she's the lady who, at Bennett's request. moved her van from the street outside his house, where she had parked it, into his driveway. Initially she was due to stay a few months but ended up parking there for 15 years. Bennett turned the story of her stay first into a novella and then into a play and now, under the direction of Nicholas Hytner, into a film and a beautiful job he's made of it.

Of course, for the purpose of dramatic and comic effect Mr Bennett has taken liberties, adding bits here and there including a delightful phantasmagorical ending. He also surrounds himself and Miss Shepherd with a host of other characters, some almost as eccentric as they are. Recreating the part she played on stage Maggie Smith is magnificent in the title role. Of course, you could say Maggie has been playing variations of Jean Brodie for the past 45 years. It's easy to see Miss Brodie in the put-downs of the Dowager, Countess of Grantham had Jean been born into a different generation or class and it's not much of a step to see Miss Shepherd as an older, very much down-on-her-luck Jean Brodie. A third Oscar is certainly not out of the question.

Jennings, too, has Bennett off to a tee and there's lovely support from the likes of Frances De La Tour, Roger Allam and Deborah Findlay as sundry neighbors while the entire cast of Bennett's "The History Boys" manage to pop up in one form or another. If it feels slighter than some of Bennett's other offerings it may simply be because here he is writing about someone we would probably pass in the street without looking twice at. Of course, if on meeting Miss Shepherd in the street we knew what we know now, we might indeed give her a second or even a third glance; we might even invite her to move her van into our driveway. Slight? Not a bit of it.

Reviewed by davidgee 8 / 10

Dame Maggie as another cranky old bird

At the bottom of the poster it says: 'This is a mostly true story.' Nicholas Hytner directs a 'revisionist' take on Miss Shepherd, the tramp-like old biddy who parked her van in Alan Bennett's front drive for a few weeks that turned into 15 years. The movie version fleshes out her story with glimpses of her past (a convent, a piano recital, a family feud, a fatal accident) which the narrator (one of the two Alan Bennetts played by Alex Jennings) tells us he only found out after she died.

A woman in front of me whispered to her companion, who wondered why Alan Bennett had a twin, that he actually had a split personality. That's not a bad explanation for the device of the householder Alan who puts up with Miss Shepherd (and clears her mess from his drive) and the writer Alan who doesn't think there's a story in this. I'm not sure that the double-act is entirely effective or necessary: a voice-over from the real Alan would have worked just as well, wouldn't it?

Despite the attempts to give the Lady a life before the Van, the screenplay is more revealing about the playwright, the reluctant Samaritan who is also having to deal with his northern mother's journey down the road to dementia. There are even a few references to the fact that Mr Bennett's sexuality was being questioned for many years before he finally outed himself.

The movie has more pace than the book and the play did. Maggie Smith is of course simply magnificent, fully absorbed into the grimy skin of this unlovable old harridan. Her performance is pitched midway between the Duchess of Downton and Muriel from the Marigold Hotel, although the character preposterously blends Hyacinth Bucket with Victor Meldrew. The 'History Boys', who largely owe their careers to Mr Bennett, pop up in a series of cameos, along with Frances de la Tour and Stephen Campbell-Moore from the same play. Jim Broadbent's scrounger is the least convincing presence and is perhaps mostly untrue.

This looks like being another highly competitive year for Oscars and BAFTAs, but Dame Maggie is certain to be a contender and could well be a winner. THE LADY IN THE VAN is not pitch-perfect in the way that THE HISTORY BOYS was (and the first - best - MARIGOLD HOTEL), but it is another master-class exemplar of British writing, acting and film- making.

Reviewed by Lloyd Bayer 6 / 10

Lady in the Van doesn't command much attention, but it's love at first sight for good old Maggie Smith.

Based on a 1970s biographical drama of the same name by noted British playwright Alan Bennett, The Lady in the Van is a "mostly true story" as mentioned at the beginning of the film. That's because Bennett had to put up with an old homeless woman for 15 years by allowing her to live in her van in his driveway. Then in 1999, Bennett cast Maggie Smith as the titular hobo in his own play. Ironically, Smith plays the same character on screen little over 15 years later.

Smith plays Mary Shepherd, an old woman literally living out of her van. She moves from house to house looking for parking space and is mostly a grumpy old woman who doesn't take kindly to anyone. She is extremely unhygienic and doesn't seem to care either. She is also a bully, and a tough one for her age. But there's something about Mary (no, that's a different film) that is equally poignant. She knows this and uses it to get almost everything she wants, including couple more vans! Meanwhile, Bennett, although always reluctant to Mary's emotional extortion, finds it humane to accommodate her. He is often seen talking to himself when there are two of him in the same frame. One is Bennett in the film and the other is Bennett the playwright scripting this story. This double imagery is also used as an allegory to illustrate his internal conflicts. One of which is the involuntary fondness he finds for Mary when he should be taking care of his aged mother living elsewhere. But after moving into his driveway, Bennett slowly learns that Mary is not the person he and everyone else think she is.

It's a bit of a mystery for us too until we learn Mary's background, her real name, and why she's so bitter yet fragile at the same time. While all this plays out slowly, albeit with typical British humour, the film is only enjoyable because of Maggie Smith. Her shrill voice, her piercing eyes, frail one moment, then boisterous the next, Smith is simply exceptional at her age. At certain points through the film you just want to reach out and hug her. She is that effective.

It's not the biggest dramedy of the year and not even the funniest, but The Lady in the Van is bound to please just about anyone. And like the titular character, it's a film hard to love, but once you do, it's equally hard to resist.

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