The Double

2013

Comedy / Drama / Thriller

The Double (2013) download yts

Synopsis


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Director

Cast

Jesse Eisenberg as Simon / James
Mia Wasikowska as Hannah
Gemma Chan as 'The Replicator' - Glamourous Judge
Chris O'Dowd as Nurse
720p 1080p
753.93 MB
1280*720
R
24.000 fps
1hr 33 min
P/S Unknown
1.44 GB
1920*1080
R
24.000 fps
1hr 33 min
P/S Unknown

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by cinematic_aficionado 7 / 10

what a great piece of filmmaking

What happens if you are a genuinely nice person? Willing to go the extra mile for others, always submissive to the wishes of your family and are generally a nice guy. You are taken for granted and treated like dirt. By your folks, colleagues and even the girl you so fancy treats you as a nonexistent entity.

As if this was not discouraging enough, a new colleague joins who is identical to you in appearance but has the completely opposite personality.

A smart telling of the Dostoevsky novel about a person who has the capacity to tolerate everything but his own double whose existence causes him a dilemma: continue to silently tolerate everything or change and adapt.

Perhaps not the easiest of movies to watch but its quirky wit and creative cinematography will win you over.

Reviewed by celluloidkiwi 9 / 10

Duelistic nature of self?

Great soundtrack. That's an impression. Superb acting given the nature of both subject and a slippery theme. Another impression. Difficult material by writers such as Dostoyevsky are deeply profound, dark reading and, as such, are a challenge to adapt to screen. A reference to Brazil is appropriate at a glance given the setting and camera work. Emulation is not flattery, but observance. Direction, camera values are not nuance, but intentional. That this film was not commercially successful points out it's import. Ironic.

That said, multiple viewings may bring even more appreciation of the story and how it is purveyed. Don't we all have someone inside that wishes to break the mold within which society cast us? Cut the strings, evolve back? Kudos to cast and crew as this theme is hard to evoke on film in a manner that engages both of us. Me and me.

Not for every viewer, but certainly for those that can see inside and out with doubt. Bravo.

Reviewed by runamokprods 8 / 10

Lots of good stuff here, weighed down by some flaws

I've now seen two films by the talented Ayodade – the other being his coming of age 'Submarine" - and had a very similar reaction though they are miles apart in style, story and theme.

First, this is a gifted film-maker, who doesn't want to play by the usual rules. Next, he knows how to get off to a great start, build a fascinating world, get you involved with his people, but third, he doesn't quite find ways to make his third acts pay off as interestingly (or powerfully or emotionally) as the first two-thirds of the film promise. In both films the focus drifts to less interesting elements or variations on the stories he's telling.

And last, he needs to lighten up on the too-obvious 'homage's to his cinematic touchstones. In "Submarine" it was (among others) Wes Anderson and "Rushmore". Here the overbearing influences (there are many) are led by Terry Gilliam's "Brazil". There were a large number of design and character choices – while effective - that came close enough that I couldn't help but sit there making comparisons ('Hey, there's Wallace Shawn doing Ian Holm'). And it starts to approach that fine line between inspiration and plagiarism.

That said, there's a lot to like here. The photography is often gorgeous. Jessie Eisenberg does a terrific job in a tough double role – a meek office worker who is suddenly faced with another employee who looks exactly like him. But the new guy has a brash, self-confident personality, everyone loves him, and no one else seems to notice the two are physically exactly alike, right down to their clothes.

This raises interesting questions about personality, perception and reality. Is "James Simon" (the cool one) merely a psychological projection of the nerd, "Simon James"? But if that's the case, why does everyone else interact with both, together and separately? Is it that Simon is the only one who thinks they look alike? i.e. is Simon projecting himself onto someone who – if we saw objectively – wouldn't even really look like him? Well, that would be an interesting idea, and a promising road for the film to explore, and it hints heavily at that possibility, only to simply drop and contradict it.

And that's part of why this is two-thirds of a great film, not a whole one. In the end things play out in a way that has been foreshadowed from early on, and suddenly the film feels less deep, less challenging, more an exercise in cinematic playfulness than an exploration of deeper themes both personal and societal. The head trip becomes too literal, the conclusions too simple for the complex surreal reality we've come to accept

On the plus side, the effects are terrific, and many of the best scenes in the film are Eisenberg talking to himself in one shot. (A hell of an acting challenge as well). And the film has a dark sense of humor that keeps the Kafkaesque world and 'big themes' from becoming ponderous, (Again, I just wish I had less often chuckled, but then thought 'hey, that just like the scene in 'Barton Fink…', or whatever).

In any case I look forward to whatever Ayoade does next, but I hope he will find a way to finish as strong as he starts, and to be brave enough to trust his own very good sense of style, and not borrow quite so much from others.

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