Red Riding: In the Year of Our Lord 1983

2009

Crime / Drama / Mystery / Thriller

Red Riding: In the Year of Our Lord 1983 (2009) download yts

Synopsis


Added By: Kaiac
Downloaded 139,509 times
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Director

Cast

David Morrissey as Maurice Jobson
Lisa Howard as Judith Jobson
Chris Walker as Jim Prentice
Shaun Dooley as Dick Alderman
720p 1080p
1.26 GB
1280*720
NOT RATED
23.976 fps
1hr 40 min
P/S Unknown
1.99 GB
1920*1080
NOT RATED
23.976 fps
1hr 40 min
P/S Unknown

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by nodisalsi 8 / 10

Criminal Thriller is not a word I will use for this, more like: Disturbing.

The Red Riding trilogy is not something one would normally watch for comedy style entertainment. The underworld criminal corruption and fascist bastard Yorkshire police encountered so far in the first two parts are just touching the surface of this crime drama; beneath this is sick, violent and twisted evil. And the final episode lays it bare.

I have to say the performance by the cast is extraordinary. Sure, you can say that actors like Sean Bean and Paddy Considine do possess a degree of cool and that they easily endow upon their character roles. However, in the final part, something happens which really surprised me and gave me the creeps.

The setting for this trilogy: 1970-1980's Britain, has touched a nostalgic nerve in me - a 40 year old Brit. However, my memories of Gypsies, vandalised cars on the street and the grassy wilderness that carries on from the back garden are all fond memories of my childhood. Red Riding brought me back into these days and these places, and introduced a host of beastly horrors and brutal realities of which - until now - I was blithely unaware.

Finally, I guess that in conclusion, I was specially targeted by this. But it may just be well-written, expertly researched, quintessentially British, supported by a great cast and neatly photographed. And the impact that was intended for the end - certainly worked on me.

Reviewed by lost-in-limbo 8 / 10

Red Riding: 1983

Here we have the final chapter of the this turbulently dark and maturely free-flowing three part mini-series, picking up three years after the second chapter, the story for 1983 might be a little convoluted (with the plot digging further into past events --- where some passages are set-up flashbacks leading us to even more surprises) it still was a fulfilling, harrowing and exciting way to close it off. It might not reach the heights of the first two chapters, as it came down a notch but for me it didn't disappoint and remained just as acceptably engaging as the previous entries.

1983 sets the story that another young girl has vanished from the same area, where nine years earlier (set-up in the first chapter; 1974) a young girl's mutilated dead body was found with angel wings. Detective Maurice Jobson was originally on the case with an autistic man Michael Mishkin being accused of the murder/s, but now of this new development the family of the accused seeks the help from dreary lawyer John Piggott to get an appeal. At first hesitant, but Piggott learns some astonishing facts from Michael about police brutality and corruption at the core. There he goes on trying to take on the Yorkshire police on his own. While Detective Jobson seems to be having a change of heart and starts digging in to the case wanting to do the correct thing, which some of his fellow officers begin questioning.

1983 pretty much follows on from 1974, as while 1980 seemed there more so there to connect/hold together some issues that worked its way in. The sprawling plot brings together all the pieces (child abuse, serial murders and police corruption) to put them as one; as every little detail, lead and revelation about this deeply crafted and intelligent crime story comes to a conclusion. Recurring characters seem to find themselves being wrapped up too and it actually centres more on the endlessly brutal actions of the police behind closed doors. The story was never about the bigger picture of police corruption and violence, but just a small note of it with how this case (and also Yorkshire ripper) was manipulated for self-gain and power… the series focused on that aspect.

Here the narrative for the last chapter is about someone trying to make a difference, no matter how much they're out of their league or badly tainted. This can be seen from the viewpoint of two central characters ; lawyer John Piggott and Detective Maurice Jobson. Both have regrets and troubled minds, but see this crusade to not turn a blind eye and at least add a touch of hope amongst such bleak, unflinching and fearful circumstances. David Morrisey had lesser roles in the early films, but this one its all about his character's transformation in what is a superbly reflective performance as Jobson. Mark Addy is also outstanding as lawyer Piggott. Then there's a third character; BJ (Robert Sheehan) who ties all the incidents together from all three chapters. The support is up to game with brilliant show-ins by Warren Clarke, Jim Carter, Daniel Mays and Peter Mullan.

Director Anand Tucker just like the other additions captures the times through place and time, embarking with a visually crisp look but never forgetting the glassy and hardened edge that made this series an uneasy and challenging viewing. What always left a mark with me throughout the series, were the music scores and this chapter was no exception. Gloomy, but soulful and emotionally tailored.

An unforgettable and stimulating TV crime drama.

Reviewed by tyler-and-jack 10 / 10

The last chance to save a swan from the wolves?

Again, I must begin this review (and I apologise) by directing you to my reviews for the first two instalments in this trilogy. Just so that you know how truly amazed/mesmerised/impressed I was by this production.

It's now 1983 and we have a number of story strands coming together and, pay attention and you shouldn't get too confused, a number of flashbacks tying everything together and revealing more than we ever realised from the first outing (the middle, 1980, section isn't really as vital although it's still a connecting vein in the overall story arch). The police corruption continues, suspects are pulled in on a whim and shown the "force" in police force, while a few good souls (including a lawyer who feels in way over his head but realises that something must be done, brilliantly played by Mark Addy) try to actually ensure that justice is done and that some innocence is saved.

What can I say that I haven't already said about the "1974" and "1980" instalments of this peerless trilogy? This has consistently impressed me beyond belief from the very start to the last minute.

Mark Addy reminds us that he really can be a great actor and deserves some more, better roles like this one. David Morrisey, ever-present throughout the trilogy, takes centre-stage here and certainly gives one of his best ever performances (certainly from the little I have seen of him). Nobody, and I mean NOBODY, has fumbled so much as one line throughout this entire trilogy and all involved should be mightily proud of such an achievement.

Am I wittering on? Exaggerating the level of quality on display here? Maybe ever so slightly but I can only go by my personal reaction to such intense, original, rarely-seen, genuinely "adult" drama and I urge others to see how they react to the material. There is no easy ride in store for viewers, once again, but you will be rewarded with one of the finest viewing experiences you can have on the small screen

See this if you like: Murder In The First, Red Riding "1974", Red Riding "1980".

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