Odd Man Out

1947

Action / Crime / Drama / Film-Noir / Thriller

Odd Man Out (1947) download yts

Synopsis


Added By: Kaiac
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Director

Cast

James Mason as Johnny McQueen
Dan O'Herlihy as Nolan
720p 1080p
858.3 MB
1280*720
Unrated
23.976 fps
1hr 56 min
P/S Unknown
1.77 GB
1920*1080
Unrated
23.976 fps
1hr 56 min
P/S Unknown

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by telegonus 10 / 10

A great film, largely overlooked

One of the most beautifully directed (Carol Reed) and photographed (Robert Krasker) films I have seen. The story revolves around the attempts of various citizens of Belfast to either aid, comfort or kill a wounded revolutionary gunman. A great deal has been written about this picture, concerning mostly its meaning, and I'm going to (heretically) skip over these issues and focus instead of why I think the film works so well as a piece of art rather than try to figure out what it's saying.

Essentially what Reed and Company have done is create a dark and gloomy urban landscape and made it seductive, even precious to us, by making us care about the people we meet there. Not that these are especially likable people. Many of them aren't, but they're presented fairly and, till near the end, without too much melodrama; and the way they're offered to us, which is to say their environments, vastly warmer and more enticing than the cold night streets the bleeding fugitive is staggering through, create a series of dramatic contrasts between the real world most of us have to move through, and the more imaginative, safer worlds of our homes, where we can retreat to, and imagine we are something else. The wounded Johnny McQueen can afford no such luxury on this bitter night, as each little warm nest offers, for a brief while, a ray of hope that this time he will come in from the cold for good, get warm, rest a little, have his wounds taken care of, and maybe even, if he gets really lucky, find himself a warm bed to sleep in.

Alas, this is not Johnny McQueen's night. Some of the people he encounters treat him decently enough for a while, till they figure out who he is, and then calculation sets in, and selfishness wins out in the end. The film is full of the kind of nocturnal yearnings anyone who has ever lived in a cold city feels as he walks the streets, whether to a pub or train station, home or restaurant, wondering what on earth he is doing out on a night such as this. One goes past this little rowhouse on a sidewalk, or that little walk-down cafe, and looks in the window, sees the people inside, and wishes one were there. Yet cold nights have their pleasures, and even rain has a beauty, as puddles reflect the light of streetlamps and rain-streaked windows make rooms that much more inviting.

Odd Man Out takes these moods, and the musings that accompany them, and raises everything to the max. Johnny isn't merely a man walking down a street, he's a hunted criminal. As we feel as he does, everything comes more intensely into focus than it would normally; as a phone booth can look like the most wonderful place in the world when the snow starts falling. The film makes us see and feel things as we seldom do in normal life, and the result is a kind of compulsive aestheticism that may well be accidental. Anything is or can be beautiful under the right circumstances, and all interior places are inviting when the temperature drops, one hasn't eaten in hours. I suspect that this wasn't the film-makers' intention, that they were hunting bigger game, looking for larger meanings, and the trappings of their picture were intended perhaps as incidental pleasures, or maybe not as pleasures at all. But it is precisely these things,--the visual tropes, not the philosophical and theological underpinnings--that I find most interesting and gratifying about the movie. In the end films have their own meaning, and this one makes me more attentive to the smaller things in life rather than the larger issues; to snow, rain, beer, to boots and overcoats, to the thin white blankets of snow that drape cities on winter nights.

Reviewed by Jay Harris 10 / 10

One of the best movies ever made

This is the film that brought James Mason to the attention of Hollywood. His Bravura performance as a wounded IRA leader hunted by the police, & various others for good & evil purposes Is of award caliber. Carol Reed`s direction is further proof a what a master director should be, This was one of the best movies of 1947 & I think it is one of the best movies of all time. The Oscar went to Gentlemans Agreement in 1947 a good film but does not compare to this or Great Expectations, also a 1947 release.

Reviewed by d94rc 10 / 10

Well played, super movie.

James Mason gives the performance of a lifetime as a dying IRA-man.

There's little I can say to add to others' description of the movie except for a few historical notes:

The city _is_ Belfast. It was shot on the streets - according to my Grandfather most outside scenes had huge audiences. The Bar which McQueen ends up in is the Crown Bar, on Great Victoria Street. The exterior of the actual bar is seen although a replica of the inside is seen. This is an architecturally beautiful bar and well worth a visit!

Mason wins the viewers' pity for a dying rebel. Remember, this is the 'old' IRA and not the latter-day thugs we are familiar with. From the outset you feel sympathy for the man and this increases as you are taken through the last hours of his life.

It is hard to get on video, though BBC2 (UK) usually shows it round Christmas. Set your video!

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