Laggies

2014

Comedy / Romance

Laggies (2014) download yts

Synopsis


Added By: Kaiac
Downloaded 7,119 times
May 20, 2016 at 2:50 PM

Director

Cast

Kaitlyn Dever as Misty
Sam Rockwell as Craig
720p 1080p
755.86 MB
1280*720
R
23.976 fps
1hr 39 min
P/S Unknown
1.44 GB
1920*1080
R
23.976 fps
1hr 39 min
P/S Unknown

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by shawneofthedead 5 / 10

A quirky, charming study of arrested development that suffers from the very syndrome it's exploring.

Just what does it mean to really 'grow up'? As kids, many of us no doubt assumed that maturity and independence would naturally follow once we hit a certain age. But, as most of us have since discovered, that isn't necessarily true: people can easily be adults in age but children in attitude. Laggies, an affable film with quirky indie sensibilities and a great cast, explores these issues with quite a lot of charm and genuine humour, although its odd plotting fails to live up to its characters in the end.

Megan (Keira Knightley) is stuck. Ten years after graduating from high school, her friends have all moved on with their lives and accumulated the accoutrements of adulthood: jobs, husbands, babies. Only Megan remains stalled in permanent adolescence, temping for her dad and living with her doting high-school boyfriend Anthony (Mark Webber). When Anthony's proposal of marriage forces her to contemplate leaving her commitment-free comfort zone, Megan takes refuge in the home of Annika (Chloe Moretz), a high-school girl who begs Megan for help in buying alcohol. In the course of a week, Megan discovers that there's more to life than idling in first gear, and draws closer to Annika and her dad, lawyer Craig (Sam Rockwell).

There's actually quite a lot to enjoy in Laggies, even if its ending is a foregone conclusion. Andrea Seigel's screenplay is sharp and smart, developing her characters into something more than stereotypes. There's a gentle, deep undertow of understanding in Megan's budding friendship with Annika - one which brings them both to a bittersweet meeting with Bethany (Gretchen Mol), the mom who abandoned Annika for a new career as a lingerie model. As played tenderly by Knightley and Rockwell, the way in which Megan is drawn towards Craig also makes sense, even if their connection feels a little forced.

The performances are also top-notch. Knightley delivers one of her most fascinating creations yet: a woman who has drifted through rather than lived her life for years, not daring to sever ties to her past but afraid to forge into the future. Her Megan is spiky and sweet, appealing even when the character's flaws threaten to overwhelm. Rockwell's part is a bit undercooked, but he's such a great actor that he lends Craig's attraction to Megan all the credibility denied it by the script. Moretz, too, is great as always, slipping into the troubled skin of Annika and creating another lost girl with plenty of spunk.

Where Laggies falters is in its final act. The last third of the film has a few great moments, including a heartrending encounter between Megan and Anthony that shouldn't work as well as it does. But it also degenerates steadily into cliché, abandoning much of its offbeat humour and complex characters for twists both odd (Megan's reaction to a car accident begs the question: is that really how a grown-up should respond to the situation?) and predictable (Megan's epiphany is a textbook rom-com moment).

In effect, Laggies stops growing, just as Megan did for ten years of her life. At the end, it provides easy answers for its characters after spending most of its running time suggesting that there are no such things: that the real world is complicated and people aren't perfect, that growing up takes effort and doesn't happen by default. This doesn't mean that the film isn't watchable - it very much is, and will reward viewers with some truly lovely moments of wry humour and quirky characterisation along the way. But its undeniable charm is also what makes Laggies' ending all the more disappointing.

Reviewed by bjarias 8 / 10

..it gets to ya.. it really does..

There's a very brief sidewalk dance sequence early on in the film that gives clear indication why so may fans are fiercely loyal and just adore Kiera. There's lots of good portrayals in this movie, but there is just something special about her in this work, and it's one of the best things she's done. Watching the film, it naturally unfolds what is happening to her, and the evolution of her character to a place where we all fully realize she needs to be going. This is a very well made, and truly enjoyable little film. With characters that are fun to watch and briefly partake in their lives. All those responsible for casting are to be most highly praised.. the group they have put together is perfect for the production, none are out of place. It's the kind of film that can and should be watched again.. to be enjoyed as much as the first time round.

Reviewed by Nicole of ArchonCinemaReviews.com 7 / 10

Quirky commentary on quarter-life crisis - funny indie, almost too real.

Laggies would have been too big a mirror put up to my twenty-something crises-ed life were it not for the comedic value of the whole she-bang.

That's mildly dramatic but really Laggies is a very original take on the quarter-life crises beseeching the Millennial generation.

Megan (Keira Knightley) is an underachieving twenty-something resigned to an underwhelming existence of still dating her high school boyfriend and working for her father. Her friends are all doing the things you're supposed to be doing when you are in your mid-to-late twenties: getting married, having babies, buying a house, etcetera etctera. With a quarter-life crisis imminently on the horizon, Megan retreats to the home of new found friend Annika (Chloe Grace Moretz), a sixteen year old high school student.

The term Laggies comes from Megan's profoundly underwhelming inferior performance in life below her potential. She is in this debilitatingly immobilizing limbo of the mid-twenties when, having done what you thought you were supposed to do and following the path you thought you were supposed to follow, you find yourself 'here' but 'here' isn't where you want to be. Andrea Seigel's screenplay does a good job of satirically making fun of the trends Milennials are doing nowadays as they 'play' house – like first dances and potential baby names.

A good movie will have characters and themes you can identify with, that will help put a mirror to life and help you engage with the narrative. For some 20-somethings most of the film and Keira Knightley's portrayal of an existential crisis may be a bit too close for comfort. Thankfully Chloe Grace Moretz's character has a dad played by Sam Rockwell. Rockwell is the shining light of a comic savior within the film and lifts up the depressing moments of story to a entertainingly watchable movie.

Laggies is a fun one-time watch for 20-somethings to realize they could be more messed up and to find the humor within the perplexities of burgeoning adulthood.

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