Hello, My Name Is Doris

2015

Comedy / Drama / Romance

Hello, My Name Is Doris (2015) download yts

Synopsis


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Cast

Beth Behrs as Brooklyn
Natasha Lyonne as Sally
Sally Field as Doris Miller
720p 1080p
661.07 MB
1280*720
R
23.976 fps
1hr 35 min
P/S Unknown
1.37 GB
1920*1080
R
23.976 fps
1hr 35 min
P/S Unknown

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by subxerogravity 8 / 10

Sally Field. You still got it, girl!

I like it, I really really liked it!

Academy Award winner, Sally Field proves that she still has the charm and charisma at this stage in life, to headline a young hip movie.

Fields plays, Doris, a seasoned Staten Islander working in accounts at a young trendy business, who develops a crush on the new Art Director who sparks the young at heart feeling Doris needed after spending her youth taking care of a ill mother.

It's a very realistic look at what it's like for someone who has an age difference form the rest of their co workers.

Sally Field was great to look at. She brings that old school class of acting to a new style of film making. Field brings a lot of respect to Doris, that makes you feel for the character and connect with what she's going through as she pursues her much younger love interest.

It's familiar and refreshing all at the same time. A funny and enjoyable must see film.

Reviewed by David Ferguson 6 / 10

Girls Night Out

Greetings again from the darkness. Hollywood has long ignored the pushback on its habit of casting younger women as the love interest of older men. In most of those movies, the relationships are treated as normal and expected. In the few movies that turn the tables, a relationship between an older woman and younger man is typically treated as either comedy or scandal … consider Harold and Maude (1971) and Notes on a Scandal (2006). In this latest film, writer/director Michael Showalter (The Baxter) and co-writer Laura Terruso strive to balance heartfelt emotions with situational laughs.

Sally Field returns to leading lady status as Doris, a never-married frumpy accountant in her late 60's who has been living in her childhood home whilst caring for her ailing mother … hoarding everything from magazines to packaged food seasoning to a single water ski. The film begins with the open casket funeral of Doris' mom, and we see her brother (Stephen Root) and his obnoxious and rude wife (Wendi McLendon) immediately pounce on Doris to clear out the clutter and sell the house. They even set her up with a hoarder specialist/therapist (Elizabeth Reaser) who finds the case quite challenging.

The real fun in the movie begins with a close encounter in the office elevator, when Doris and her cat-eye glasses come face to face with a handsome and charming young man who offers up a compliment – something Doris rarely experiences. Of course, a few minutes later, we learn the young man is John (Max Greenfield, "New Girl"), the new artistic director in Doris' office. For years, Doris has depended upon cheesy romance novels to supply the fantasy in her life, and now the lessons from that reading kick into full gear.

It's a night out with her best friend Roz (Tyne Daly) that results in a chance interaction with a cocky motivational speaker (Peter Gallagher) whose catchphrase is "Every week has seven days. None of them are named Someday". He leaves Doris with this thought: "Impossible means I'm possible". When combined with those romance novels, Doris now sees a realistic chance for love if she pursues the man of her dreams … the aforementioned (and half her age) John.

With the help of Roz' teenage granddaughter (Isabella Acres), Doris learns how to Facebook stalk, and soon enough ends up at a concert with John's favorite techno band, Baby Goya and Nuclear Winters (led by Jack Antonoff of Fun.). John and his group of hipster friends are enamored with Doris' vintage clothes and quirky sense of style and speech. She soon finds herself posing in spandex for Baby Goya's album cover, going to dinner parties, and joining a rooftop knitting group of millennials.

Judging by the boisterous laughing by women in the theatre, this is a prime "GNO" flick for women of all ages. Most of the comedic situations seemed pretty obvious and predictable, and I found some traits of Doris to be less than appealing. However, as a statement on what happens when the outside world passes by, and generational gaps become almost impossible to bridge, the film makes a bold statement on real friendship between mature women. It poses the question, what determines whether a personal awakening is real or imagined?

Sally Field (turning 70 in 2016) gives a terrific performance, and it goes much deeper than someone who puts her reading glasses on top of her regular glasses and wears giant bows in her giant hairpiece. Ms. Field has excelled in such previous work as "Sybil" (1975), Norma Rae (1978), Places in the Heart (1983), and Lincoln (2011). She understands comedy and human drama, and as Doris … you'll kind of like her. You'll really kind of like her!

Reviewed by Paul Allaer 7 / 10

"Impossible? I'm possible!"

"Hello, My Name Is Doris" (2015 release; 90 min.) brings the story of Doris (played by Sally Field). As the movie opens, we see Doris mourning the passing of her mom, and being pressured by her brother to sell the maternal house, or at least get rid of all the stuff Doris is hoarding. It's not long before we see Doris doing her daily work commute on the Staten Island Ferry to Manhattan, and in the packed elevator onto the office, she is pressed up against a younger guy, who turns out to be the new art director at her work. Doris promptly develops a crush on him. At this point we're 10 minutes or so into the movie, but to tell you more would spoil your viewing experience, you'll just have to see for yourself how it all plays out.

Couple of comments: this rom-com is directed by Michael Showalter, best known for writing and starring in the "Wet Hot American Summer" film (and subsequent Netflix prequel series). Here, he tackles the subject of the older woman-younger guy potential relationship with a light touch. The first half of the movie goes for the outright comedy aspects, as we see the Sally Filed character in a number of improbable (including some brought as fantasy) scenes, to the total delight of last night's theater crowd, which went absolutely wild with laughter (more on that later). At some point, Doris and her friend Roz go to see a motivational speaker, where she confides about her 'impossible' crush on her co-worker. "Impossible? Make that I'm possible!" advises the speaker, ha! The second half of the movie goes more into more serious aspects, including surprisingly but very effectively the hoarding issues (the hoarding "intervention" scene is for me the best of the entire movie). Sally Field, now a crisp 69 years young, brings a stellar performance as the perky Doris, completely blowing away Max Greenfield (exactly half her age) as her co-worker John, Beth Behrs (as John's possible flame), and the rest of the cast. Tyne Daly as her friend Roz remains feisty as ever, The movie is well paced, and clips by in no time. There is a surprising amount of great indie music featured in the movie, including from Pearl and the Beard, Bryan Wells, and a bunch of other unknowns (to me anyway).

"Hello, My Name Is Doris" made quite a splash when it was first shown at SXSW 2015, yes exactly a year ago already, Not sure why it's take this long for it to get a general release. The movie opened this weekend on a single screen for all of Greater Cincinnati, and the Saturday evening screening where I saw this at was absolutely packed to the rafters (tilting heavily towards seniors, I might add). The audience absolutely LOVED the movie, laughing out loud, hooting and hollering where you might expect it, and giving a round of applause when the end titles started rolling. From that reaction, I'd say that this movie has all the makings of a solid hit on the art-house theater circuit. If you are in the mood for a light-hearted rom-com that at times touches on some serious aspects as well, you cannot go wrong with this.

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