Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

1953

Comedy / Crime / Music / Romance

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) download yts

Synopsis


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Director

Cast

Marilyn Monroe as Lorelei Lee
Noel Neill as Passenger
George Chakiris as Chorus Boy
Robert Fuller as Chorus Boy
720p 1080p
649.39 MB
1280*720
G
23.976 fps
1hr 31 min
P/S Unknown
1.37 GB
1920*1080
G
23.976 fps
1hr 31 min
P/S Unknown

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Righty-Sock 8 / 10

Under Howard Hawks' direction Marilyn was a sexual delight striking, in one of her numbers, a 'Gilda' pose…

Marilyn's "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" was one of the classic musicals of the 1950's... She comes into it looking like a winner, and leaves as one… The picture has been set fully by the tone of her personality… Her personality infuses every corner of the film as if she has even picked the scenery to work for her…

The movie rises above its pretext, its story, its existence as a musical, even its music, and becomes at its best a magic work, yet it is a light-hearted satire of the old adage that when a woman goes bad, men go right after her…

The film crowned Monroe in her position as the nation's new 'Love Goddess' with the promise of many sparkling hits to come, and Jane Russell's career continued, with less fanfare, but very successfully for several more years…

The story was simple: Dorothy (Jane Russell) and Lorelei (Marilyn Monroe) work together as entertainers and are also good friends… Lorelei's millionaire fiancé Gus Esmond (Tommy Noonan) sends the girls to France, but his father (Taylor Holmes) hires a private detective, Malone (Elliott Reid) on the same boat to spy on her during the trip… When the three meet, Dorothy falls for Malone, much to the chagrin of Lorelei, who cannot understand Dorothy's indifference to men with money…

On board, the girls get into trouble when they meet an old playboy Francis Beckman (Charles Coburn), a diamond merchant…

Reviewed by Lechuguilla 7 / 10

Enjoyable no-brainer of a musical with Monroe and Russell at their peak...

A gold-digging, or rather diamond-digging, "dumb" blonde, played by Marilyn Monroe, and her singing gal pal, played by the vivacious Jane Russell, provide mutual support on a love boat cruise, where they flirt with, and woo, eligible and preferably rich, men, in this musical comedy from the early 50's. The story is thin and nonsensical. But that's OK, because the film's strengths lie in its comedic script, its dazzling musical numbers, and the inclusion of the visually stunning M. Monroe, as Lorelei Lee.

Superficially, Lorelei "seems" like a not very bright "babe", especially in some of her comments. For example, she counsels Russell's character by saying: "I want you to find happiness --- and stop having fun". But there is a subtle quality about Lorelei that suggests that she may be smarter than she lets on. One wonders if Monroe, who was quite intelligent and bookish in real life, was really acting in this film, or just being herself.

While there are several lively, and memorable, musical numbers, they are all lead-ins to the lavish, eye-popping musical finale. On a stage adorned in garish colors (orange, pink, and black mostly), a breathtakingly glamorous Monroe belts out the popular song: "Diamonds Are A Girl's Best Friend". Her singing (partially dubbed) is not quite as credible as the performance of Carol Channing in the Broadway version. Still, the film's finale is a cinematic spectacle, a veritable feast for the eyes and ears. "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" is not a heavy weight "message" film. It is instead a pleasant and entertaining bit of fluff, where the emphasis is on fun, music, and glamour.

Reviewed by gftbiloxi 9 / 10

Talk to Me, Harry Winston, Tell Me All About It!

While it will never compete with the likes of SINGIN' IN THE RAIN, GIGI, or MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS, this 1953 confection is nonetheless a real charmer. Based on a popular Broadway show which was itself based on the famous novel by Anita Loos, GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES tells the story of two cabaret performers--blonde bombshell Loreli Lee, who is determined to marry for money, and brunette beauty Dorothy Shaw, who prefers to marry for love. When Loreli's engagement to a millionaire's son goes awry, the two set sail for Europe, and comic complications ensue. The story is traditional fluff, pure and simple, and there is nothing in the least innovative or unexpected about the film as a whole--but it is all extremely, extremely well done.

The score is bright, including such tunes as the famous "Diamonds Are A Girl's Best Friend"--and all the musical numbers are cleverly staged and filmed. The overall look of the film is also eye popping: the ladies are dressed to perfection and the color cinematography is truly joyous. The script is full of comfortable wit, director Hawks keeps it moving at a nice clip, and the cast includes such enjoyable performers as Charles Coburn, Tommy Noonan, Norma Varden, and George Winslow. But what really makes the film memorable are Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell, who simply sparkle with star quality and play their with roles in a twinkle-in-the-eye style.

Monroe and Russell have remarkable chemistry on screen, and although neither were really singers they each had enjoyable and very distinctive singing voices; their performances are so pleasantly amusing that you can't help but smile. Both also had a way with comedy, with Monroe offering her quintessential 'not so dumb blonde' and Russell matching her all the way as the wise-to-you brunette determined to keep Monroe out of trouble. And so well do they work together it is hard to pick a favorite between the two. Call it fluff, froth, foolish--but even jeweler Harry Winston couldn't refuse this good time, even at the risk of a diamond or two. Thoroughly enjoyable for any one still capable of a smile.

Gary F. Taylor, aka GFT, Amazon Reviewer

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