Florence Foster Jenkins

2016

Biography / Comedy / Drama / Music / Romance

Florence Foster Jenkins (2016) download yts

Synopsis


Added By: Kaiac
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Director

Cast

Rebecca Ferguson as Kathleen
Meryl Streep as Florence Foster Jenkins
Hugh Grant as St Clair Bayfield
Simon Helberg as Cosmé McMoon
720p 1080p
805.65 MB
1280*720
PG-13
24 fps
1hr 51 min
P/S Unknown
1.67 GB
1920*1080
PG-13
24 fps
1hr 51 min
P/S Unknown

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by RichardAlaba-CineMuse 8 / 10

A tragic tale about mental illness told on an operatically grand scale.

Genre labels shape your expectations of a movie but they are also manipulated by promoters to influence audience response. Both Marguerite (2016) and Florence Foster Jenkins (2016) are being sold as "hilarious comedies" whereas in reality they both tell a sad story of self-deception and mental frailty, albeit in funny ways. Marguerite is a comedy of manners, while Florence is a tragi- comedy, the genre that shows the sad truth behind the apparently ridiculous. Both films are bio- pics, with one satirising vanity the other telling a tragic tale about a mental illness that is displayed on an operatically grand scale.

Unlike the fictitious Marguerite who is 'loosely based' on the real person, Florence is closely based on the wealthy and generous arts socialite Florence Foster Jenkins who came to public notoriety when she hired Carnegie Hall for her operatic recitals in 1944. Both films (and still available YouTube recordings) show the full force of how badly the real Florence sang, but that's where the similarity ends. Early in the film we learn that Florence (Meryl Streep) has defied medical science by living well beyond the usual lifespan of a syphilis victim, a disease she contracted on marrying when 18 years old. She endured decades of archaic mercury and arsenic medication with progressive loss of mental functions and chronic exhaustion. Her second marriage remained celibate by mutual agreement and her husband (Hugh Grant) was free to have affairs but was devotedly protective of Florence. The cinematic impact of these facts change the film from a satire to a study of pathos and tragedy as Florence is seriously unwell and singing is the only thing keeping her alive.

While Marguerite amplifies the ridiculous as seen from the other side of the Atlantic, Florence is an American-owned story and any ridicule is tempered with compassion. The combined acting virtuosity of icons Streep and Grant will most likely earn the film Academy nominations as these timeless stars are superb in their parts and their chemistry together is wonderful. Top production values are evident in the period set and costumes, and the whole film has an elegant authenticity that underscores the seriousness of mental degeneration, whether its on the stage of Carnegie Hall or elsewhere. Audiences might leave cinemas still chuckling at the singing of Marguerite and Florence, but many will leave Florence with sympathy for her desperate desire to be something that nature made impossible.

Reviewed by Martin Bradley (<a class= 9 / 10

A near career best performance from Streep

Surely only those with some knowledge of musical history and consequently at least some love of music, or perhaps a penchant for eccentricity like myself, will ever have heard of Florence Foster Jenkins, reputedly the world's worst singer, so without a ready-made audience why a biopic now, (two, if you count the new French film "Marguerite")? Maybe someone somewhere saw in this tale of a deluded grande dame a star vehicle for a talented actress of a certain age as well as an audience-pleasing combination of comedy and pathos and that's exactly what you get. No real knowledge of the subject is necessary to enjoy Stephen Frears' hugely enjoyable biopic "Florence Foster Jenkins" which combines comedy, pathos and a close to career best performance from Meryl Streep, (who else), to terrific effect and if you think Streep can play anything, in her sleep if necessary, pause a moment. On a technical level she may be the most versatile actress in the world but much too often she's been accused of failing to connect on an emotional level. I've always felt her Margaret Thatcher a great piece of mimicry but hardly worthy of a third Oscar and there are those who will claim that her Florence Foster Jenkins is nothing more than a shameless ploy for that elusive fourth Oscar. I will simply say that if she is to win that fourth Oscar surely it has to be for this great performance. Streep clicks on every level; this a tragic-comic performance of the first water in which Meryl never puts a foot wrong and yes, technically it's a marvel too with Streep doing her own appallingly off-key singing, (no mean feat for an actress with a superb voice). This isn't just the best thing she's done since "Doubt" but one of the best things she's ever done.

Amazingly it isn't all a one-woman show; the big revelation here is Hugh Grant as Jenkins' husband, the man who loves her, you might say exploits her, and does his best to protect her. It's the least Hugh Grant-like performance of his career and he's never been better. Likewise "The Big Bang Theory's" Simon Helberg as Cosme McMoon, Jenkins' accompanist, is outstanding in a difficult role. It's also beautifully written by Nicholas Martin, looks great, (the period detail is spot on), and is very well directed by Frears. As we head into the silly season of superhero blockbusters and the kind of of films designed to keep the kids quiet in the summer months this splendid biography may be the last good movie we will see at our multiplexes for months.

Reviewed by E23-films 7 / 10

★★★★ - moving and melancholic

This movie, in my opinion, is mislabeled. The trailers would lead you to believe it's a hilarious comedy about an old crazy woman who dreams of being a singer despite being tone-deaf. There are elements of that, of course, but it has much more to it than just that.

Don't get me wrong, there are a fair few funny moments, especially the first time we hear Jenkins screeching wildly, and watching McMoon desperately contain his laughter. These successes are partially due to Nicholas Martin's organic and genuine screenplay, but mostly down to great casting (apart from some of the terrible secondary characters!). Simon Helberg is fantastic as the competent and camp young pianist, and Hugh Grant gives his best performance in years as Jenkins' devoted husband. But the movie belongs to Meryl Streep, who once again proves that nothing is beyond her. Each word she smoothly speaks, or screechingly screams, feels like her own as she embodies "the world's worst singer".

Technically, the movie is impressive too. The 1940s mis-en-scene is brilliant, from the outrageous outfits to the elegant decor and old-fashioned automobiles that inhabit wartime New York. Cohen's cinematography and Bonelli's editing keep the film moving (physically and emotionally), but Stephen Frears is the true genius, taking a story which could have been boring and turning it into something engaging.

As with Philomena, Frears has taken a sad, gentle, tender story and made it surprisingly feel-good, fun and enjoyable without shying away from the melancholy.

4/5

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