Carousel

1956

Action / Drama / Music

Carousel (1956) download yts

Synopsis


Added By: Kaiac
Downloaded 61,174 times
July 17, 2016 at 3:17 PM

Director

Cast

Shirley Jones as Julie Jordan
John Dehner as Mr. Bascombe
Cameron Mitchell as Jigger Craigin
Gene Lockhart as Starkeeper / Dr. Selden
1080p
1.95 GB
1920*1080
Approved
23.976 fps
2hr 8 min
P/S Unknown

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by mark.waltz 10 / 10

This ranks as my favorite Rodgers and Hammerstein

For years, I searched for this film on TV, plus the old Magnetic video copy released during the late 1970's. However, other than the occasional pay channel, it was never on. Local channels would play all of the other Rodgers and Hammerstein films, but this one was not one of them for some reason. I had heard the score before. It was perhaps Rodgers and Hammerstein's most RECORDED score. There were two major Broadway cast albums, both starring John Raitt, as well as a variety of studio-recorded albums. It was even done for TV in the 1960's with Robert Goulet, a version I hope eventually will be released. The score is one of the most beautiful to listen to, and the lyrics are inspiring. The movie leads, Gordon MacRae and Shirley Jones, are perfectly cast, and their singing voices beautifully fill the roles. They are even better in this than they were in "Oklahoma!". As Julie's best friend, Carrie, Barbara Ruick is a perfect contrast to Jones' innocent Julie. She is unintentionally flirtatious, yet not "easy" like Gloria Grahame's Ado Annie in "Oklahoma!". Those two roles are very similar in the sense that they are both the second leads with a comic twist, but I found Ruick's Carrie more developed character wise. As her leading man, Robert Rouseville's Mr. Snow can seem a bit stuffy, but his character is a product of his times: quietly macho, not in the romantic sense, but that a girl like Carrie simply wanting a home and family would be perfect for him. Cameron Mitchell's Jigger Crane, the "Jud Fry" of the story, comes on as a some-what light-hearted villain; it is his actions which will ultimately affect the destinies of our lovers Julie and Billy. As the pricklish Mrs. Mullins, owner of the carousel, delightful Audrey Christie was perfectly shrewish. Finally, as the sweet and wise Aunt Nettie, Claramae Turner was wonderful as the musical's voice of reason, a role often scene in Rodgers and Hammerstein musicals. Her rendition of "You'll Never Walk Alone" is unforgettable.

It is totally believable that Julie and Billy would fall for each other. They are both attractive young adults. Yes, he did beat her, and she stayed with him in spite of this. This was the 1870's, and women did stay with the men they loved in spite of things like this. One of the reasons things like this are important to be seen today is to show how far women have come. In the man-dominated New England of that time, women were secondary citizens, so it is realistic to portray Julie in this light. Sad yes, but a part of history.

The New England sets are breath-taking, particularly during the "June is Bustin' Out All Over" number, and in the climactic clambake. They are beautifully photographed, making the film mesmerizing to look at. Between the sumptuous singing of MacRae and Jones and the wonderful cinemascope technicolor, the film is simply outstanding. I find it hard to find any faults with this film, and could simply watch it over and over.

Reviewed by mallard-6 10 / 10

Classic R&H Musical With Superb MacRae and Jones...

This is a great film, based on a great show. It is perfectly cast, and has the world's best love song (If I Loved You) in a smashingly romantic setting. I shudder to think what the film would have been like with several who were possible leads--Frank Sinatra and Gene Kelly--because Gordon MacRae is so right--physically and vocally--for the role, and Shirley Jones is marvelously young and innocent and beautiful.

The new (as of 5/99) DVD production is stunning, bringing wide screen, impeccable color, sharp definition, and glorious sound to the mix.

This Rodgers and Hammerstein show is a classic, and must not be missed!

Reviewed by mark.waltz 10 / 10

Beautiful and inspiring

For years, I searched for this film on TV, plus the old Magnetic video copy released during the late 1970's. However, other than the occasional pay channel, it was never on. Local channels would play all of the other Rodgers and Hammerstein films, but this one was not one of them for some reason. I had heard the score before. It was perhaps Rodgers and Hammerstein's most RECORDED score. There were two major Broadway cast albums, both starring John Raitt, as well as a variety of studio-recorded albums. It was even done for TV in the 1960's with Robert Goulet, a version I hope eventually will be released. The score is one of the most beautiful to listen to, and the lyrics are inspiring. The movie leads, Gordon MacRae and Shirley Jones, are perfectly cast, and their singing voices beautifully fill the roles. They are even better in this than they were in "Oklahoma!". As Julie's best friend, Carrie, Barbara Ruick is a perfect contrast to Jones' innocent Julie. She is unintentionally flirtatious, yet not "easy" like Gloria Grahame's Ado Annie in "Oklahoma!". Those two roles are very similar in the sense that they are both the second leads with a comic twist, but I found Ruick's Carrie more developed character wise. As her leading man, Robert Rouseville's Mr. Snow can seem a bit stuffy, but his character is a product of his times: quietly macho, not in the romantic sense, but that a girl like Carrie simply wanting a home and family would be perfect for him. Cameron Mitchell's Jigger Crane, the "Jud Fry" of the story, comes on as a some-what light-hearted villain; it is his actions which will ultimately affect the destinies of our lovers Julie and Billy. As the pricklish Mrs. Mullins, owner of the carousel, delightful Audrey Christie was perfectly shrewish. Finally, as the sweet and wise Aunt Nettie, Claramae Turner was wonderful as the musical's voice of reason, a role often scene in Rodgers and Hammerstein musicals. Her rendition of "You'll Never Walk Alone" is unforgettable.

It is totally believable that Julie and Billy would fall for each other. They are both attractive young adults. Yes, he did beat her, and she stayed with him in spite of this. This was the 1870's, and women did stay with the men they loved in spite of things like this. One of the reasons things like this are important to be seen today is to show how far women have come. In the man-dominated New England of that time, women were secondary citizens, so it is realistic to portray Julie in this light. Sad yes, but a part of history.

The New England sets are breath-taking, particularly during the "June is Bustin' Out All Over" number, and in the climactic clambake. They are beautifully photographed, making the film mesmerizing to look at. Between the sumptuous singing of MacRae and Jones and the wonderful cinemascope technicolor, the film is simply outstanding. I find it hard to find any faults with this film, and could simply watch it over and over.

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