A Man Called Sledge

1970

Western

A Man Called Sledge (1970) download yts

Synopsis


Added By: Kaiac
Downloaded 15,243 times
July 16, 2016 at 3:25 PM

Director

Cast

James Garner as Luther Sledge
Dennis Weaver as Erwin Ward
Claude Akins as Hooker
John Marley as Old Man
720p 1080p
647.63 MB
1280*720
R
23.976 fps
1hr 33 min
P/S Unknown
1.37 GB
1920*1080
R
23.976 fps
1hr 33 min
P/S Unknown

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by spider89119 7 / 10

Definitely worth watching.

"A Man Called Sledge" is unique among the spaghetti westerns I have seen so far because it is the only one directed by an American. Vic Morrow must have been a big fan of spaghetti westerns himself, because he really got it right. It must have been a lot of fun for an American director to go to Spain and Italy to shoot an authentic spaghetti western back when the genre was still being pumped out.

I wasn't expecting much spaghetti style from this film because I knew it was by an American director with mainly American actors, but the movie really surprised me. It's nowhere near the very top of the spaghetti meter, but on the other hand you would never mistake this one for a Hollywood western. It's got Italian written all over it. The music score by Gianni Ferrio is quite good. A couple of parts sound a little too much like jazz for me, but most of it is well-suited for the genre, especially the tunes with vocals and over-the-top cheesy lyrics.

Don't let the fact that this movie is one of the later-era spaghetti westerns and has James Garner in it fool you into thinking it's one of those goofy comedy type of Euro-westerns. There are a couple of funny lines in the film, but overall it's very serious and tragic with plenty of violence and action. This is not a happy film at all, which is definitely a good thing in this case.

The production values and acting are above-average for a Eurowestern. James Garner and Dennis Weaver, both of whom have usually portrayed happy/funny do-gooders in American films and television shows, do an excellent job here in their roles as seriously bad people. Casting them for those parts was probably done for effect. It reminds me of how Leone used Henry Fonda as the evil character in Once Upon a Time in the West.

This is one that is definitely worth seeing if you are into Euro-westerns.

Reviewed by marc-366 8 / 10

"And my friends - for gold they died"

I must confess to "umming and ahhing" a fair bit as to whether I really wanted to see this film. I've got nothing against James Garner, but he just didn't say "spaghetti western protagonist" to me. He doesn't have that certain "kill" look in his eye (think Eastwood, Nero, Gemma, Steffen et el). However, having always respected Howard Hughes' "Essentials" book, this was one of the few films that he had covered so far that I had not seen - and his recommendations had generally not disappointed. I am really glad that I did dispel these initial reservations, because Man Called Sledge makes great viewing from beginning to end.

Luther Sledge (Garner) is introduced to us as he enters a bar with one of his cohorts. Leaving his colleague to participate in an ill-fated card game, Sledge reunites himself with his lover Ria (Laura Antonelli). After a night of passion (lucky man!) he is woken by the sound of a gunshot. He returns to the bar to find his partner dead, and forced to defend himself against the killers. An old timer witness (John Marley) confirms that Sledge has merely defended himself.

Sledge and the old timer soon cross paths again, with the former assuming that he is being tracked due to the price on his head. However, it soon transpires that the old man has been spying on a delivery of gold. This gold is transported by a posse of armed guards and stored in a top security prison overnight. The old man recounts how he spent time in the jail, with his cell sitting side by side to the safe.

The lure of the gold is too much for Sledge, and he is soon devising a scheme to get his hands on the horde and allow him to settle down and lead an honest life with Ria. And what better way to get access to the treasure than to find ones self imprisoned in the jail......

A simple yet highly enjoyable idea for a story, with double crossing aplenty and a cracking soundtrack. If truth be told, I am still not completely sold on Messrs Garner and Weaver in the spaghetti genre, but the film itself more than makes up for such minor grumbles. There are some great scenes, with Sledge's wilful imprisonment (with some very shady characters forming his prison mates) a particular highlight.

Highlighly recommended, and grasping at a possible "must view" berth.

Reviewed by John Macaluso 10 / 10

Other Men's Gold (Lyrics)

I like the song sung in this movie so much that I will share the lyrics with all who might like to learn the song. Here goes.

Come listen here to my story which must be told. Of how men fought and died but not for glory, only for gold. Gold was their god, gold was their guide, For it they lived, for it they lied, And my friends, for gold they died.

Seven men dreamed of holding fortunes in gold, Gold that would make them rich until they grew old. Dreams of the thrill, as they feel their dust spill, through their fingertips, And they laugh at the curse that follows other men's gold.

Remember man, you are dust, and to dust you'll return. If you sell out your soul, then in Hell you will burn. Think of what you've been told, 'bout worshiping gold. And take care my friend, You must beware... of the curse that follows other men's gold.

Seven men gambled on the turn of a card, gambling their gold away and losing came hard. They weren't satisfied until 6 of them died, only one man lived... to tell the tale of the curse that follows other men's gold.

Remember man, you are dust, and to dust you'll return. If you sell out your soul, then in Hell you will burn. Think of what you've been told, 'bout worshiping gold. And take care my friend, You must beware... of the curse that follows other men's gold.

Remember man, you are dust, and to dust you'll return. If you sell out your soul, then in Hell you will burn. Think of what you've been told, 'bout worshiping gold. And take care my friend, You must beware... of the curse that follows other men's gold.

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