’71 (2014) download yts

Synopsis


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Director

Cast

Jack O'Connell as Gary Hook
Charlie Murphy as Brigid
Sean Harris as Captain Sandy Browning
Paul Anderson as Sergeant Leslie Lewis
720p 1080p
755.86 MB
1280*720
R
23.976 fps
1hr 39 min
P/S Unknown
1.44 GB
1920*1080
R
23.976 fps
1hr 39 min
P/S Unknown

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Alex Heaton (azanti0029) 9 / 10

A superb debut from this team - Brilliant piece of film making

Set against the complex backdrop of the beginnings of Northern Ireland in 71 but before Bloody Sunday really turned the tide in the favour of the IRA in 72 this is an extremely well made taught piece of drama. With an assured performance by rising star Jack O'Connell in the lead, he plays a young soldier Gary Hook recently deployed to Northern Ireland who finds himself out of his dept when going on his first patrol thanks to the incompetence of his CO (Sam Reid) - Separated from his unit and lost in a city he doesn't know he's forced in a fight for survival as its hard to tell who is friend and who is foe in this extremely well written piece of drama. The writer here has taken care not to paint one side entirely good or bad and that is how it was. Wounded and armed with nothing but a knife Hook has enemies closing in from all sides as the film draws to a bloody climax.

I don't want to be accused of gushing praise, but there is much to compliment the whole team involved here, from the tones of the production design, beautifully capturing the mood feel and look of the 1970's in drab pastels and the grey of urban decay. The editing, directing, lighting is all bang on the money but greatest of all is the casting, for it is not only O'Connell who shines here, but the younger members of the cast almost upstage him with their brilliant performances. Two stand outs of the younger cast were Corey McKinley (Listed rather almost like an extra on here as 'Loyalist Child which seems a little unfair) and Barry Keoghan - The former is clearly a star in the making with his ballsy performance while Keoghan with almost no lines makes an amazing impact with simple looks conveying the struggles of emotion he feels inside when it comes to committing to a path of violence. Veterans Sean Harris brings his creepy presence to the duplicitous under cover unit commander but it is an energetic performance by O'Connell that brings it all together. Let us hope we do not loose him to Hollywood entirely. The film also takes time to give Hooks character some context, so we have some idea of his own life and attachments back home. A man almost without a family but not without people who are depending on him, this is a true depicting for many whom join the army, an alternative to spending life on the dole.

This film is living proof that we can make thrilling and exciting cinema in the UK but still leave some room for Social Commentary within the context of a great story - an excellent thriller which hints at the dark path that was to follow in Northern Ireland for many years. Strongly recommended.

Reviewed by toberwino 6 / 10

The curate's egg

I felt this was a film about N Ireland made for audiences outside N Ireland. As with many films portraying my home country, most of the accents made me cringe. Also, the effect of a burning car or bus at the end of ever street was overdone. As for the pints of Guinness served like pints of bitter ..... Life was bad during the troubles, but not that bad. The film didn't gloss over the life of a squaddie, being required to do things and be places they probably had no understanding of. The quote about army life, which seems to be used in most media discussions, "the rich telling the stupid to shoot the poor" sums it up well. The portrayal of the role of special ops and their relationship with all sides in the conflict would probably be educational for those with a limited knowledge of N Ireland's history over the past 40 years. I'm glad I saw this movie but I have little inclination to watch it again.

Reviewed by CharlieGreenCG 10 / 10

Brutal, thrilling and utterly dramatic.

Introduced by a hard-hitting boxing fight; the ethos of '71 is immediately understood. It is brutal, thrilling and an utterly dramatic directorial debut from Yann Demange.

Part of a new regiment, Jack O'Connell's lead character, Gary Hook, is deployed to Belfast, Northern Ireland to help control an emergency situation caused by IRA terrorism. Gaining an essence of Full Metal Jacket meeting I am Solider – the film is quite honest in what it wants to be, and the narrative because of it flows consistently in the right direction.

Sent into the front-line urban warfare, Hook's regiment, under the command of Lieutenant Armitage (Sam Reid) is quickly bombarded with urine and pooh packages. Then quickly followed by one of the most realistic, violent and dramatic riots that has ever appeared in film.

Soon, Hook is separated from his group and forced to survive as a lone-wolf in the devilish-toned IRA hostile territory. All quickly intensifies to an incredible Bourne-style chase through the streets of terror; what with the cars alight at each corner, crisp cinematography - everything feels authentic.

'They do not care about you, to them, you are just a piece of meat' – one character announces to Hook. But how wrong they are, as '71 soon turns into a game of cat vs. cat vs. mouse in a hunt of find him first.

Led by Jack O'Connell (Starred Up), his performance is uncanny – but just one of the many highlights that '71 serves up. Co-starring alongside, Sean Harris and Paul Anderson play undercover superiors, yet are as corrupt as Bad Lieutenant.

Regimented like the army, '71 is on point. Everything is there for a reason, and it shows on screen. Struck with luck, but unlucky to have been there in the first place, Jack O'Connell prospers and carries the film even when it is unneeded and secures it as one of this year's best thrillers.

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